How to convert plans and procedures to video and eLearning

 

 

Introduction

Get rid of written content that no one reads or takes too long to reference and understand. Convert your message to a more dynamic and relevant format such as video or online eLearning, without spending a fortune. Read on if you want to update your plans and procedures or better communicate your message with suppliers, partners, staff, customers, and other stakeholders.

By the end of this article you will have a strategy and solution to converting old documents, plans and procedures to dynamic, content rich and informative videos to be used in isolation or as part of an eLearning suite.

Convert Plans to video and elearning

Preparation

Your current plans and procedures may not be in the best or most logical format for conversion to video. You need to convert them to a more script-orientated version. Use your current or revised table of contents and created each chapter as if you were creating an episode of a television series.

Break each section or sub-chapter down into manageable segments of a few hundred words each.

Map out your images, backgrounds, and characters in advance. If you have key visuals or images related to your content (the whole point of the conversion), ensure you have them mapped to your script. Backgrounds can be used in conjunction with audio, text or even the utilization of a green screen addition. Ensure you characters, those that will feature or speak in the recordings are prepared, rehearsed or clear on how you are going about this and what you are trying to achieve.

Set up your hardware in the best environment that you want to replicate. If you want a clear, unaffected audio and video outcome, use a studio. If you want ambient noise and the real feeling from a workplace or location, shoot live.

Create your introductory and closing sequences in advance, so you can focus on the content recording and creation elements exclusively.

Process

Shoot short segments, using your shortened scripts. If you are doing just audio, don’t aim for perfection unless you have voice over talent. If recording for the first time, remember you are speaking to people so include inflection in your voice and make elements conversational or informative, not a monotonous monologue.

Ensure your project is rich with images and relevant content and build on key points with stages or animations. If you’re using text, limit it to no more than a single sentence per point or message.

File all your raw footage in to the corresponding chapters and subsections. Introduce manageable segments to your editing platform in groups of 3-8 only so as to avoid data loss or crashes.

Create thumbnails of each chapter for use later in eLearning systems.

Add your meta data such as electronic chapters and markers as you go. Use these for later electronic navigation guides.

Don’t add or modify effects such as transitions, Ken Burns, callouts, annotations and the like at this stage.

Editing

Once you have your subchapters and chapters ready, begin the final edit. Add all your opening and closing sequences, along with identifiers such as chapter, title, outcomes, etc. Also add all your transitions and effect but don’t overdue it as it will taint the entire outcome.

Allow twice the time it took to record for editing. And ensure you watch final sequence in both fast and normal time for clarity.

Once complete, render the video into a format that is best suited to your final streaming or viewing site. Also ensure the size and format is compatible with your final platform too.

Final Version

Ensure you modify the audio and frame rates for online streaming of you are using the final product for eLearning or video streaming.

Format the resolution and size to fit within the parameters of the system or platform. Pay particular attention to text and fine graphics so as not to loose the message or content due to resolution reductions.

Consider having your online platform host and stream the video message rather than relying on desktop software, extensions and other add-ons that may cause conflicts or limit the experience for some or many users.

Offer the format with both video and printed/downloadable written content to support all learning styles. Also include an audio or podcast version for audio exclusive streaming.

Publishing

Convert Plans to video and elearningLoad the video files to a public or private site. If using a public platform such as YouTube, ensure you select the appropriate security or embedding options for singular viewing or integration with other sites. Only use captioning if you have prepared this in advance and don’t rely on provider versions.

If using a private system, consider all issues such as access, audience, formats, enhancements, tracking, etc. Load videos in accordance with your table of contents and structure of the original or revised content. Add thumbnails to each chapter for visual navigation and referencing.

Provide a site map or hyperlinked directory for speedy access to select elements or return/revision sessions.

Add a tutorial or instructional video to the front to the eLearning to aide in navigation, use and comprehension of the objectives. You can even add a message from the CEO or senior executive/s.

As plans or procedures get updated or replaced, only replace those that need modification and send notification of changes.

The entire system can be set up on drip feed to send a video or message on a regular, scheduled basis to select or group audiences to promote knowledge and use of the system.

Consider embedding links and references in other formats such as PDF or other standing documents.

Any business or department can utilize this process or system to create excellent and informative video to replace or even enhance most policy and procedures. All this can be achieved using cost effective tools and systems.

Conclusion

Now you can get rid of written content that no one reads or takes too long to reference and understand. Immediately set about converting your message to a more dynamic and relevant format such as video or online eLearning, without spending a fortune. You know now how to update your plans and procedures and better communicate your message with suppliers, partners, staff, customers and other stakeholders. Don’t waste any more time, at least try to make an introductory version, then set about modernizing your plans and procedures into a more engaging and usable version.

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How to convert plans and procedures to video and eLearning

 

 

Introduction

Get rid of written content that no one reads or takes too long to reference and understand. Convert your message to a more dynamic and relevant format such as video or online eLearning, without spending a fortune. Read on if you want to update your plans and procedures or better communicate your message with suppliers, partners, staff, customers, and other stakeholders.

By the end of this article you will have a strategy and solution to converting old documents, plans and procedures to dynamic, content rich and informative videos to be used in isolation or as part of an eLearning suite.

Convert Plans to video and elearning

Preparation

Your current plans and procedures may not be in the best or most logical format for conversion to video. You need to convert them to a more script-orientated version. Use your current or revised table of contents and created each chapter as if you were creating an episode of a television series.

Break each section or sub-chapter down into manageable segments of a few hundred words each.

Map out your images, backgrounds, and characters in advance. If you have key visuals or images related to your content (the whole point of the conversion), ensure you have them mapped to your script. Backgrounds can be used in conjunction with audio, text or even the utilization of a green screen addition. Ensure you characters, those that will feature or speak in the recordings are prepared, rehearsed or clear on how you are going about this and what you are trying to achieve.

Set up your hardware in the best environment that you want to replicate. If you want a clear, unaffected audio and video outcome, use a studio. If you want ambient noise and the real feeling from a workplace or location, shoot live.

Create your introductory and closing sequences in advance, so you can focus on the content recording and creation elements exclusively.

Process

Shoot short segments, using your shortened scripts. If you are doing just audio, don’t aim for perfection unless you have voice over talent. If recording for the first time, remember you are speaking to people so include inflection in your voice and make elements conversational or informative, not a monotonous monologue.

Ensure your project is rich with images and relevant content and build on key points with stages or animations. If you’re using text, limit it to no more than a single sentence per point or message.

File all your raw footage in to the corresponding chapters and subsections. Introduce manageable segments to your editing platform in groups of 3-8 only so as to avoid data loss or crashes.

Create thumbnails of each chapter for use later in eLearning systems.

Add your meta data such as electronic chapters and markers as you go. Use these for later electronic navigation guides.

Don’t add or modify effects such as transitions, Ken Burns, callouts, annotations and the like at this stage.

Editing

Once you have your subchapters and chapters ready, begin the final edit. Add all your opening and closing sequences, along with identifiers such as chapter, title, outcomes, etc. Also add all your transitions and effect but don’t overdue it as it will taint the entire outcome.

Allow twice the time it took to record for editing. And ensure you watch final sequence in both fast and normal time for clarity.

Once complete, render the video into a format that is best suited to your final streaming or viewing site. Also ensure the size and format is compatible with your final platform too.

Final Version

Ensure you modify the audio and frame rates for online streaming of you are using the final product for eLearning or video streaming.

Format the resolution and size to fit within the parameters of the system or platform. Pay particular attention to text and fine graphics so as not to loose the message or content due to resolution reductions.

Consider having your online platform host and stream the video message rather than relying on desktop software, extensions and other add-ons that may cause conflicts or limit the experience for some or many users.

Offer the format with both video and printed/downloadable written content to support all learning styles. Also include an audio or podcast version for audio exclusive streaming.

Publishing

Convert Plans to video and elearningLoad the video files to a public or private site. If using a public platform such as YouTube, ensure you select the appropriate security or embedding options for singular viewing or integration with other sites. Only use captioning if you have prepared this in advance and don’t rely on provider versions.

If using a private system, consider all issues such as access, audience, formats, enhancements, tracking, etc. Load videos in accordance with your table of contents and structure of the original or revised content. Add thumbnails to each chapter for visual navigation and referencing.

Provide a site map or hyperlinked directory for speedy access to select elements or return/revision sessions.

Add a tutorial or instructional video to the front to the eLearning to aide in navigation, use and comprehension of the objectives. You can even add a message from the CEO or senior executive/s.

As plans or procedures get updated or replaced, only replace those that need modification and send notification of changes.

The entire system can be set up on drip feed to send a video or message on a regular, scheduled basis to select or group audiences to promote knowledge and use of the system.

Consider embedding links and references in other formats such as PDF or other standing documents.

Any business or department can utilize this process or system to create excellent and informative video to replace or even enhance most policy and procedures. All this can be achieved using cost effective tools and systems.

Conclusion

Now you can get rid of written content that no one reads or takes too long to reference and understand. Immediately set about converting your message to a more dynamic and relevant format such as video or online eLearning, without spending a fortune. You know now how to update your plans and procedures and better communicate your message with suppliers, partners, staff, customers and other stakeholders. Don’t waste any more time, at least try to make an introductory version, then set about modernizing your plans and procedures into a more engaging and usable version.

3 Steps to Using Social Media for Crisis Communications

 

 

Introduction

Use social media to protect your brand and drive your message during routine and crisis communications. Read this article to find out how to use social media to measure the effectiveness of your communications, collect intelligence on what is being said about you or brand, constructing an effective communications campaign and how to best position, engage or dominate the conversation with your content.

By the end of this article, you will have the best defensive and offensive plan to utilize social media technologies during routine and crisis communications to protect and preserve your brand and reputation.

social media for crisis communications

1. How to measure effectiveness

Search engines measure and log just about everything that gets entered into their tools, so should you. Use the very tools that return search results or place you in the public eye to find out how effective your message has been and how wide it has been circulated.

Forget conventional press releases or the over reliance of agencies to do this, check and monitor yourself.

Use an analytics tool to identify where recent traffic has originated from and the volume associated. Separate the targeted traffic that has come in via a specific message and that of routine or random sources. Google analytics is the most common.

Place the title of your message or content in quotation marks and place it into a search engine. See where or if you appear on the first page. If you’re not on the first page, it doesn’t account for much. Also see how much completion you have for this message or title and monitor the results. Check all the alternates such as news, videos, blog, etc. to see where/if you rank there also. Constrain the results to the time period of your crisis or message, such as the past 24 hours and monitor the results.

Put the link to your page into a ranking tool that shows you what pages and titles your page or site is currently ranking for and monitor/evaluate the results.

Set up alerts or monitoring tools to advise you if/when similar, related or your content about the issue is published anywhere on the internet.

This approach is best used when you have a message or in order to review your most recent actions. It is highly recommend that you use the next step of collecting information and intelligence before you even get to this stage as it will always provide more effective and consistent results.

2. How to collect information and intelligence on your brand and your critics

Utilize some of the previously mentioned tactics but widen your search to include your brand, names of critics or associated terms.
Use a tool like Google Insights or Google Trends to track the popularity and origin of the bulk of the interest or traffic seeking information about your event, brand or reputation.

Calculate the page rank of your website, and that of critics, to determine who will have the highest ranking or widest voice when they publish updates or content. Do this by putting your website address into a page rank checker tool.

Conduct a comprehensive analysis of the top 10 sites associated with your message or event. Determine the age of the domain, backlinks, page rank, percentage of content related to topic and audience it reaches. This will help you to assess if you will ever reach the first page or help identify threats and allies.

Take the website URL from a site, page or source that you have identified as being concerning or threatening and put it into a search engine in quotation marks. The result will help you determine how many other sites have used or referenced this content by the number the search engine returns between your search content and results.

Assess and measure how many fans, subscribers or followers a site or release channel has to help calculate the audience and breadth of release.

Build your own communities, fans, networks and channels for routine and crisis communications long before you ever need them. You cannot dominate the Internet or search engines overnight. You need a wide base, consistent message, quality content and establish platform that helps with routine communications but can also aide during crisis or emergency to ensure you get your side of the story public or at the very least provide a balanced view.

Use multiple social media channels and keep the profile and message consistent. Only create secondary or linking networks after you have done this step.

Don’t ever use holding statements or generic, advance content in the assumption it will provide any benefit during a crisis.

3. Constructing a campaign to engage, position or dominate the conversation

Once you have isolated the key terms, keywords or topics using the previously identified methods, build one or more campaigns around this subject. Forget what terms you think are important (unless you have confirmed you have the lead on this and can influence the development of the message) and build your campaign around this phrase/s.

First create a written message. Keep it around 400-700 words. Ensure it has the key phrase in the message approximately 2-5% of the overall content. Put the keyword in the title. Then use this first message as a press release, blog update, article and audio script.

Create an audio version of the message, again with the same metrics. Prepare this release for podcast style release and convergence with images for a short video.

Create a video, using screen capture, video editing, camera or even smart phone. Ensure the video and audio have written scripts. If you created them without scripts, have them transcribed. Release the video and script as a joint release.

Publish all your content using burst and timed release tools. Ensure you are communicating on this issue more than your loudest or most prolific critic. Use all channels within social media spectrums such as YouTube, Twitter, Posterous, Tumblr, Facebook, etc.

Promote across channels, such as tweeting a video, commenting on a blog, bookmarking a press release.

Now drive traffic to these releases, engage, monitor, update and contribute.

Rinse, repeat and do it again.

Rinse, repeat and do it again. Yes, keep doing it for as long as it takes to be seen, heard or appear on the first page.

You won’t have time to learn and establish this kind of system overnight so you need to have it scoped, developed and established in advance. If not, have a system for creating and distributing your content in the shortest possible time. Under 1-3 hours in most cases.

Social Media.Search Engine Marketing Melbourne.Strategy.Image

Conclusion

Now you know how to protect your brand and drive your message during routine and crisis communications using social media. In this article we covered how to use social media to measure the effectiveness of your communications, collect intelligence on what is being said about you and your brand, constructing and effective communications campaign and how to best position, engage or dominate the conversation with your content.

Immediately review your current strategies and understanding of using social media to communicate for routine and crisis communications and compare it against this seasoned and proven approach. Make changes now to ensure you are both ready and capable for the daily and extra ordinary demands of online communications using social media.